A different form of ‘capital’

We humans tend to measure the value of most things in life in terms of money. Well, that is no revelation certainly. But I am sure the urge to monetize everything in our lives- including our relations- was never this ubiquitous as it is in these modern times. We just don’t seem able to consider anything that doesn’t generate money ‘valuable’. Since the time we spend with those who are supposed to be our loved ones (especially our parents, grandparents, kids) hardly ever generates monetary profit, most of us find it, at best, to be some commendable act of generosity on our part, or a burden we dutifully shoulder. At worst, it feels like a waste of our precious time.

I think that most of us will have, at some point or another, consciously or unconsciously, thought along these lines, even if it is just for a fleeting moment. We might have felt guilty and pushed these thoughts away but, the truth is, with how our thinking and values have been conditioned in this day and age, it is very hard not to disappointingly think of simple, warm human interaction, or the time leisurely spent with people so closely related to us, as of little gain.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

If we slow down the usual pace of our busy lives for a few moments every now and then, and try to squeeze in little chunks of time where we relax and sit down around the coffee table with the people closest to us, exchanging a few smiles with them here and there (even if there is no particular reason to), leisurely carrying on mundane conversations about happenings of the day or simply arguing about the best way to make the most delicious chai….we might be able to see many other reflections in the prism of everyday life that may never otherwise cross our mind’s eye. We might find that just as we need to ‘bullet-speed’ through each day- working, dropping kids off at school, paying the bills, grocery shopping, putting food on the table- we also need to ‘slo-mo’ life sometimes. We might also find that those few smiles we share with our parents, spouses and kids recharge us for another day like nothing else can.

There might be long moments of silence where we have nothing to say each other, no interesting conversation to strike up, or are simply too tired to chitchat. But if we think closely, we will find that even those moments are priceless. Even those silent, leisurely pauses energize and rejuvenate. And turn out to be strangely rewarding and fulfilling. They give us the zeal and the positivity needed to push through life harder and better.

Make space for these moments in your life. Even if you have to go a little out of your way for that. Even if you can’t always make energetic conversations. Even if you have to sit together for long moments of silence sometimes.

Because they are the capital you build your happiness and contentment upon. They might not generate any monetary profit, but the heart will always feel rewarded… And your life better anchored!

I think that most of us will have, at some point or

I think that most of us will have, at some point or another, consciously or unconsciously, thought along these lines, even if it is just for a fleeting moment. We might have felt guilty and pushed these thoughts away but, the truth is, with how our thinking and values have been conditioned in this day and age, it is very hard not to disappointingly think of simple, warm human interaction, or the time leisurely spent with people so closely related to us, as unprofitable and unrewarding.

, consciously or unconsciously, thought along these lines, even if it is just for a fleeting moment. We might have felt guilty and pushed these thoughts away but, the truth is, with how our thinking and values have been conditioned in this day and age, it is very hard not to disappointingly think of simple, warm human interaction, or the time leisurely spent with people so closely related to us, as unprofitable and unrewarding.

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